Posts Tagged ‘credentials’

Achieving 10x

There is an interesting conversation thread on Slashdot asking “What practices impede developers’ productivity?” The conversation is in response to an excellent post by Steve McConnell from 2008 addressing productivity variations among software developers and teams and the origin of “10x” – that is, the observation noted in the wild of “10-fold differences in productivity […]

A Modest Proposal: 2.1

From the genius of David Burge comes an enhancement to my modest proposal for gently deflating the higher education bubble: In the name of Consumer Protection, recent college graduates should have the ability to return the diploma and not make any reference to receiving education from the college in exchange for a 100% refund of […]

Essential Graphics #1

The Lack of Insight Edition In 1949, John Gurden received the following biology report card from his professor at Eton College: “His other work has been equally bad, and several times he has been in trouble, because he will not listen, but will insist on doing his work in his own way.” He was 15, […]

Good Intentions, Bad Results

In The Logic of Failure, Dietrich Dörner makes the following observation: In our political environment, it would seem, we are surrounded on all sides with good intentions. But the nurturing of good intentions is an utterly undemanding mental exercise, while drafting plans to realize those worthy goals is another matter. Moreover, it is far from […]

A Modest Proposal: 2.0

Earlier I proposed the idea of repossessing credentials for students who default on student loans. This past week, an improvement to this proposal has come to light. The idea is described by  Michael Simkovi in an excellent Social Science Research Network paper titled “Risk Based Student Loans.” Without risk-based pricing of student loans, there may […]

What, More Gruel?!?

A question came up in conversation yesterday whether or not universities and colleges “should” provide a broad based liberal education and mandate certain courses. The libertarian (lower case “L”) part of my conscience hollered “No!” It implies students are incapable of determining their own futures and deciding for themselves what is of interest. Establishing class […]

Designer Degrees

College students, their parents, and the economy are mixing in a way that is causing an important realization to emerge. And that is, there is no one type of post high school educational program that will work for a broad population of students and situations. Different needs, different interests, and different financial resources are generating […]

A Modest Proposal: Credential Repossession

“Ignorance of a law is no excuse,” a judge might admonish, “for having broken a law.” But apparently, ignorance of the contractual agreements one signs is an excuse for not fulfilling the terms of the contract. For those of us paying taxes, the various financial bailouts of the past several years have left us paying […]

Expert 2.0

“Read outside your field,” suggests Wally Bock: Some of the most powerful, breakthrough ideas happen when you adopt practices that are common in other fields. It’s a good tip. And in the comments, Adi Gaskell notes: Many of their solutions are provided by people working outside of their normal field of expertise. Also true and […]

Cook’s Theory of Performance Evaluation

The ideas presented here evolved from a post titled “Evaluate people at their best or their worst?” on John Cook’s blog. In order to make this post a little tighter, I’ll refer to John’s ideas as “Cook’s Theory of Performance Evaluation” and describe it as follows. John identifies three ways a person’s performance can be […]