Archive for the ‘management’ Category

Good Intentions, Bad Results

In The Logic of Failure, Dietrich Dörner makes the following observation: In our political environment, it would seem, we are surrounded on all sides with good intentions. But the nurturing of good intentions is an utterly undemanding mental exercise, while drafting plans to realize those worthy goals is another matter. Moreover, it is far from […]

What Language Do You Speak?

The Logitech webcam software installer doesn’t seem to know what to offer. QA and testing. Still important.

Farming as a Metaphor for Workplace Culture

Michael Wade has an interesting post considering how non-agricultural workplaces can resemble farms. Workplace cultures are in large part a reflection of the underlying metaphor driving the organization, whether by design or chance. When much younger, I used and advocated the “business is war” metaphor. I have been much more successful (and much less stressed) […]

ROWE and Formal Project Management

Reading Michelle Symonds’ article “Why Project Management and ROWE Don’t Mix” and Jody Thompson’s response, “OMG. WTF? Pt.4” left me with one conclusion. Symonds is more focused on solution whereas Thompson is more focused on selling ROWE. They both make valid points and I’ve used – even relied on – aspects of product and personnel […]

A Liberal Arts Education and Asperger’s Syndrome

In a conversation focused on the value of a liberal arts education in today’s economic and social climate, a classmate took the following position: The problem lies in the social aspect of non-traditional schools and an example of this would be the Colorado School of Mines. Mines is a very tough engineering school that focuses […]

What is the scariest novel based in a workplace?

Mike Wade asks “What is the scariest novel based in a workplace?” and suggests Moby Dick. The scene in which Ishmael realizes that he is stuck in a vast expanse of ocean on a whaling ship captained by a mad man with unquestioned authority still gives me the chills. Strictly speaking, I’d have to go […]

QA and Testing – The Importance of Being Thorough

QA and testing is not easy. Those who do it well deserve good pay. Those who don’t, can make life interesting for a company in unpleasant and embarrassing ways. Case in point: I subscribe to a company, called HomeAgain, which provides lost pet recovery services for people who have micochiped their pets. It’s inexpensive and […]

Gone Phishing

“Trust, but verify,” goes the old saying. Fished, no doubt, from the same pool of wisdom that includes “caveat emptor” and a school of other supposedly common sense quips that nobody seems to follow when it counts. When it comes to critters that land in our inboxes, the smart practice would be to “Distrust until […]

Expert 2.0

“Read outside your field,” suggests Wally Bock: Some of the most powerful, breakthrough ideas happen when you adopt practices that are common in other fields. It’s a good tip. And in the comments, Adi Gaskell notes: Many of their solutions are provided by people working outside of their normal field of expertise. Also true and […]

Degreed vs. Qualified

John Cook makes several good points with respect to the distinction between “professional” and “amateur.” A professional is someone who does a thing for money, and an amateur is someone who does it for love. Volunteer fire fighters are amateurs in the best sense, doing what they do out of love of the work and […]