Posts Tagged ‘transfer of learning’

Using Origami to Explain What I Do

This is interesting: Getting Crafty: Why Coders Should Try Quilting and Origami I’ve never done any quilting (I’ve a sister who’s excellent at that), but I’ve done origami since forever. In fact, origami was a way to explain to other people what I did for a living. I’d start with a 6” x 6” piece […]

From Gamification to Simulation: Enhancing the Transfer of Learning

Each year brings to the business world a new swarm of buzzwords. Many are last year’s buzzwords, humming the same tune at a different pitch, fighting to find new life in the buzzword-eat-buzzword business world. Others are new arrivals from beyond the information horizon. I caught one of the new ones in my net earlier […]

Why We Do What We Do

A colleague of mine is of the opinion that “we won’t have truly evolved as a species until we stop doing things simply because we can. Perhaps it is more like we won’t know we have truly evolved as a species until we stop doing things because we can.” I counter with the opinion that […]

What, More Gruel?!?

A question came up in conversation yesterday whether or not universities and colleges “should” provide a broad based liberal education and mandate certain courses. The libertarian (lower case “L”) part of my conscience hollered “No!” It implies students are incapable of determining their own futures and deciding for themselves what is of interest. Establishing class […]

Gone Phishing

“Trust, but verify,” goes the old saying. Fished, no doubt, from the same pool of wisdom that includes “caveat emptor” and a school of other supposedly common sense quips that nobody seems to follow when it counts. When it comes to critters that land in our inboxes, the smart practice would be to “Distrust until […]

Expert 2.0

“Read outside your field,” suggests Wally Bock: Some of the most powerful, breakthrough ideas happen when you adopt practices that are common in other fields. It’s a good tip. And in the comments, Adi Gaskell notes: Many of their solutions are provided by people working outside of their normal field of expertise. Also true and […]

Seeing vs. Visualizing – Part II

Thinking further about my previous post on seeing vs. visualizing, and doing a bit more research, there is more to add. After falling down the rabbit hole for some considerable time, I ended up with solid footing on Korzybski’s insight: A map is not the territory it represents, but, if correct, it has a similar […]

Social Learning Theory and Mandatory Volunteerism

The following exchange is from the discussion forum  for OTL560, “Facilitating Learning and Transfer.” The discussion topic for this week was to prepare a “top ten list of best practices for K-12 facilitation.” The assignment was a little vague, but presumably we needed to frame this within the context of various learning theories we’ve researched. […]

Seeing vs. Visualizing

Quantifying transfer of learning is a difficult task. Many attempts to substantiate the efficacy of any particular learning theory for facilitating learning transfer have proven to be elusive. This isn’t surprising, in light of Haskell’s (2001) observation, “Transfer is the basis of mental abstraction, analogical relations, classification, generalization, generic thinking, induction, invariance, isomorphic relations, logical […]

Delayed transfer of learning

While researching this weeks’ discussion topic in my Masters program, I came across a recent LA Times article that made me think about, for lack of a better phrase, the intentional delay of transfer of learning. Roan (2011) summarizes, For more than a decade, California and other states have kept their newest teen drivers on […]