Posts Tagged ‘relative experience’

Moving Past “I Don’t Know”

Recently I had the opportunity to attend the Mile High Agile 2015 conference in Denver where Mike Cohn delivered the morning keynote address: “Let Go of Knowing: How Holding onto Views May Be Holding You Back.” As you might expect from a seasoned professional, it was an excellent presentation and very well received. A collection […]

Agile Planning Poker has a Tell

As an exercise, planning poker can be quite useful in instances where no prior method or process existed for estimating levels of effort. Problems arise when organizations don’t modify the process to suite the project, the composition of the team, or the organization. The most common team composition for these these types of sizing efforts […]

Achieving 10x

There is an interesting conversation thread on Slashdot asking “What practices impede developers’ productivity?” The conversation is in response to an excellent post by Steve McConnell from 2008 addressing productivity variations among software developers and teams and the origin of “10x” – that is, the observation noted in the wild of “10-fold differences in productivity […]

Good Intentions, Bad Results

In The Logic of Failure, Dietrich Dörner makes the following observation: In our political environment, it would seem, we are surrounded on all sides with good intentions. But the nurturing of good intentions is an utterly undemanding mental exercise, while drafting plans to realize those worthy goals is another matter. Moreover, it is far from […]

Designer Degrees

College students, their parents, and the economy are mixing in a way that is causing an important realization to emerge. And that is, there is no one type of post high school educational program that will work for a broad population of students and situations. Different needs, different interests, and different financial resources are generating […]

A Liberal Arts Education and Asperger’s Syndrome

In a conversation focused on the value of a liberal arts education in today’s economic and social climate, a classmate took the following position: The problem lies in the social aspect of non-traditional schools and an example of this would be the Colorado School of Mines. Mines is a very tough engineering school that focuses […]

Expert 2.0

“Read outside your field,” suggests Wally Bock: Some of the most powerful, breakthrough ideas happen when you adopt practices that are common in other fields. It’s a good tip. And in the comments, Adi Gaskell notes: Many of their solutions are provided by people working outside of their normal field of expertise. Also true and […]

Degreed vs. Qualified

John Cook makes several good points with respect to the distinction between “professional” and “amateur.” A professional is someone who does a thing for money, and an amateur is someone who does it for love. Volunteer fire fighters are amateurs in the best sense, doing what they do out of love of the work and […]

Seeing vs. Visualizing – Part II

Thinking further about my previous post on seeing vs. visualizing, and doing a bit more research, there is more to add. After falling down the rabbit hole for some considerable time, I ended up with solid footing on Korzybski’s insight: A map is not the territory it represents, but, if correct, it has a similar […]

Everyone is a student, everyone is a teacher

A Buddhist proverb reads, “When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.” I have found this to be true and it marks one of the many ways in which my life has been fortunate. As is often the case with proverbs, there is a corollary which is equally true: “When a student appears, the […]