Posts Tagged ‘collaboration’

Managing Client Behavior for Optimal Sprint Performance

I’ve a new article published on Mike Cohn’s Front Row Agile web site: Managing Client Behavior for Optimal Sprint Performance. Related PostsPracticing Agile – Building Mastery One Day At A Time That Isn’t What I Expected Agile 2.0 Achieving 10x What Language Do You Speak?

Moving Past “I Don’t Know”

Recently I had the opportunity to attend the Mile High Agile 2015 conference in Denver where Mike Cohn delivered the morning keynote address: “Let Go of Knowing: How Holding onto Views May Be Holding You Back.” As you might expect from a seasoned professional, it was an excellent presentation and very well received. A collection […]

Agile Team Composition: Generalists versus Specialists

In a previous post, I described several of the shortcomings with planning poker, particularly when the tool is used in a context that includes more than just the developer’s shop. Estimating levels of effort for a set of tasks by a close knit group of individuals well qualified to complete those tasks can efficiently and […]

Collaboration and Code Authorship Credits

In their book “Team Geek”, Brian Fitzpatrick and Ben Collins-Sussman make the following valid point: The tradition of putting your name at the top of your source code is an old one (heck, both of us have done it in the past [GE: As have I.]), and may have been appropriate in an age where […]

Agile Planning Poker has a Tell

As an exercise, planning poker can be quite useful in instances where no prior method or process existed for estimating levels of effort. Problems arise when organizations don’t modify the process to suite the project, the composition of the team, or the organization. The most common team composition for these these types of sizing efforts […]

The World Needs More Booths

Amen, brother. Remember face-to-face conversation? You know, sharing thoughts, talking through concerns, sketching out ideas, and having intelligent discussions without the overblown internet persona outrage? You have instant feedback through facial expressions, tone of voice, and spoken word. You have instant ability to clarify a particular point, on the spot. You get a better “read” […]

Farming as a Metaphor for Workplace Culture

Michael Wade has an interesting post considering how non-agricultural workplaces can resemble farms. Workplace cultures are in large part a reflection of the underlying metaphor driving the organization, whether by design or chance. When much younger, I used and advocated the “business is war” metaphor. I have been much more successful (and much less stressed) […]

ROWE and Formal Project Management

Reading Michelle Symonds’ article “Why Project Management and ROWE Don’t Mix” and Jody Thompson’s response, “OMG. WTF? Pt.4” left me with one conclusion. Symonds is more focused on solution whereas Thompson is more focused on selling ROWE. They both make valid points and I’ve used – even relied on – aspects of product and personnel […]

Research Citation Lifespan – II

In a previous post, I made the following point regarding the downside of arbitrarily placing a five year expiration date on research citations: Depending how you look at it, The Five Year Rule either exacerbates or supports the “publish or parish” death march. If research work has a shelf life of five years before its […]

Research Citation Lifespan

Made an interesting discovery recently regarding research citations. Apparently, all research has an expiration date…sort of. As originally presented in my Masters program at CSU Global, citing research older than five years would not be viewed very favorably by the Thesis Committee. Specifically, the professor offered this in the discussion forum: “Always strive to obtain […]